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Product Description

Crime fiction master Raymond Chandler''s sixth novel featuring Philip Marlowe, the "quintessential urban private eye" (Los Angeles Times). 

In noir master Raymond Chandler''s The Long Goodbye, Philip Marlowe befriends a down on his luck war veteran with the scars to prove it. Then he finds out that Terry Lennox has a very wealthy nymphomaniac wife, whom he divorced and remarried and who ends up dead. And now Lennox is on the lam and the cops and a crazy gangster are after Marlowe.

From Library Journal

Chandler is not only the best writer of hardboiled PI stories, he''s one of the 20th century''s top scribes, period. His full canon of novels and short stories is reprinted in trade paper featuring uniform covers in Black Lizard''s signature style. A handsome set for a reasonable price.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"Raymond Chandler is a master." -- The New York Times

“[Chandler] wrote as if pain hurt and life mattered.” -- The New Yorker

“Chandler seems to have created the culminating American hero: wised up, hopeful, thoughtful, adventurous, sentimental, cynical and rebellious.” --Robert B. Parker, The New York Times Book Review

“Philip Marlowe remains the quintessential urban private eye.” -- Los Angeles Times

“Nobody can write like Chandler on his home turf, not even Faulkner. . . . An original. . . . A great artist.” — The Boston Book Review

“Raymond Chandler was one of the finest prose writers of the twentieth century. . . . Age does not wither Chandler’s prose. . . . He wrote like an angel.” -- Literary Review

“[T]he prose rises to heights of unselfconscious eloquence, and we realize with a jolt of excitement that we are in the presence of not a mere action tale teller, but a stylist, a writer with a vision.” --Joyce Carol Oates, The New York Review of Books

“Chandler wrote like a slumming angel and invested the sun-blinded streets of Los Angeles with a romantic presence.” —Ross Macdonald

“Raymond Chandler is a star of the first magnitude.” --Erle Stanley Gardner

“Raymond Chandler invented a new way of talking about America, and America has never looked the same to us since.” --Paul Auster

“[Chandler]’s the perfect novelist for our times. He takes us into a different world, a world that’s like ours, but isn’t. ” --Carolyn See

From the Inside Flap

Marlowe befriends a down on his luck war veteran with the scars to prove it. Then he finds out that Terry Lennox has a very wealthy nymphomaniac wife, who he''s divorced and re-married and who ends up dead. and now Lennox is on the lam and the cops and a crazy gangster are after Marlowe.

From the Back Cover

Marlowe befriends a down on his luck war veteran with the scars to prove it. Then he finds out that Terry Lennox has a very wealthy nymphomaniac wife, who he''s divorced and re-married and who ends up dead. and now Lennox is on the lam and the cops and a crazy gangster are after Marlowe.

About the Author

Raymond Thornton Chandler (1888 - 1959) was the master practitioner of American hard-boiled crime fiction. Although he was born in Chicago, Chandler spent most of his boyhood and youth in England where he attended Dulwich College and later worked as a freelance journalist for The Westminster Gazette and The Spectator. During World War I, Chandler served in France with the First Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, transferring later to the Royal Flying Corps (R. A. F.). In 1919 he returned to the United States, settling in California, where he eventually became director of a number of independent oil companies. The Depression put an end to his career, and in 1933, at the age of forty-five, he turned to writing fiction, publishing his first stories in Black Mask. Chandler''s detective stories often starred the brash but honorable Philip Marlowe (introduced in 1939 in his first novel, The Big Sleep) and were noted for their literate presentation and dead-on critical eye. Never a prolific writer, Chandler published only one collection of stories and seven novels in his lifetime. Some of Chandler''s novels, like The Big Sleep, were made into classic movies which helped define the film noir style. In the last year of his life he was elected president of the Mystery Writers of America. He died in La Jolla, California on March 26, 1959.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

The first time I laid eyes on Terry Lennox he was drunk in a Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith outside the terrace of The Dancers. The parking lot attendant had brought the car out and he was still holding the door open because Terry Lennox''s left foot was still dangling outside, as if he had forgotten he had one. He had a young-looking face but his hair was bone white. You could tell by his eyes that he was plastered to the hairline, but otherwise he looked like any other nice young guy in a dinner jacket who had been spending too much money in a joint that exists for that purpose and for no other.

There was a girl beside him. Her hair was a lovely shade of dark red and she had a distant smile on her lips and over her shoulders she had a blue mink that almost made the Rolls-Royce look like just another automobile. It didn''t quite. Nothing can.

The attendant was the usual half-tough character in a white coat with the name of the restaurant stitched across the front of it in red. He was getting fed up.

"Look, mister," he said with an edge to his voice, "would you mind a whole lot pulling your leg into the car so I can kind of shut the door? Or should I open it all the way so you can fall out?"

The girl gave him a look which ought to have stuck at least four inches out of his back. It didn''t bother him enough to give him the shakes. At The Dancers they get the sort of people that disillusion you about what a lot of golfing money can do for the personality.

A low-swung foreign speedster with no top drifted into the parking lot and a man got out of it and used the dash lighter on a long cigarette. He was wearing a pullover check shirt, yellow slacks, and riding boots. He strolled off trailing clouds of incense, not even bothering to look towards the Rolls-Royce. He probably thought it was corny. At the foot of the steps up to the terrace he paused to stick a monocle in his eye.

The girl said with a nice burst of charm: "I have a wonderful idea, darling. Why don''t we just take a cab to your place and get your convertible out? It''s such a wonderful night for a run up the coast to Montecito. I know some people there who are throwing a dance around the pool."

The white-haired lad said politely: "Awfully sorry, but I don''t have it any more. I was compelled to sell it." From his voice and articulation you wouldn''t have known he had had anything stronger than orange juice to drink.

"Sold it, darling? How do you mean?" She slid away from him along the seat but her voice slid away a lot farther than that.

"I mean I had to," he said. "For eating money.

"Oh, I see." A slice of spumoni wouldn''t have melted on her now.

The attendant had the white-haired boy right where he could reach him--in a low-income bracket. "Look, buster," he said, "I''ve got to put a car away. See you some more some other time--maybe."

He let the door swing open. The drunk promptly slid off the seat and landed on the blacktop on the seat of his pants. So I went over and dropped my nickel. I guess it''s always a mistake to interfere with a drunk. Even if he knows and likes you he is always liable to haul off and poke you in the teeth. I got him under the arms and got him up on his feet.

''Thank you so very much," he said politely.

The girl slid under the wheel. "He gets so goddam English when he''s loaded," she said in a stainless-steel voice. "Thanks for catching him."

"I''ll get him in the back of the car," I said.

"I''m terribly sorry. I''m late for an engagement." She let the clutch in and the Rolls started to glide. "He''s just a lost dog," she added with a cool smile. "Perhaps you can find a home for him. He''s housebroken--more or less."

And the Rolls ticked down the entrance driveway onto Sunset Boulevard, made a right turn, and was gone. I was looking after her when the attendant came back. And I was still holding the man up and he was now sound asleep.

"Well, that''s one way of doing it," I told the white coat.

"Sure," he said cynically. "Why waste it on a lush? Them curves and all."

"You know him?"

"I heard the dame call him Terry. Otherwise I don''t know him from a cow''s caboose. But I only been here two weeks."

"Get my car, will you?" I gave him the ticket.

By the time he brought my Olds over I felt as if I was holding up a sack of lead. The white coat helped me get him into the front seat. The customer opened an eye and thanked us and went to sleep again.

"He''s the politest drunk I ever met," I said to the white coat.

"They come all sizes and shapes and all kinds of manners," he said. "And they''re all bums. Looks like this one had a plastic job one time."

"Yeah." I gave him a dollar and he thanked me. He was right about the plastic job. The right side of my new friend''s face was frozen and whitish and seamed with thin fine scars. The skin had a glossy look along the scars. A plastic job and a pretty drastic one.

"Whatcha aim to do with him?"

"Take him home and sober him up enough to tell me where he lives."

The white coat grinned at me. "Okay, sucker. If it was me, I''d just drop him in the gutter and keep going. Them booze hounds just make a man a lot of trouble for no fun. I got a philosophy about them things. The way the competition is nowadays a guy has to save his strength to protect hisself in the clinches."

"I can see you''ve made a big success out of it," I said.

He looked puzzled and then he started to get mad, but by that time I was in the car and moving.

He was partly right of course. Terry Lennox made me plenty of trouble. But after all that''s my line of work.


* * *

I was living that year in a house on Yucca Avenue in the Laurel Canyon district. It was a small hillside house on a dead-end street with a long flight of redwood steps to the front door and a grove of eucalyptus trees across the way. It was furnished, and it belonged to a woman who had gone to Idaho to live with her widowed daughter for a while. The rent was low, partly because the owner wanted to be able to come back on short notice, and partly because of the steps. She was getting too old to face them every time she came home.

I got the drunk up them somehow. He was eager to help but his legs were rubber and he kept falling asleep in the middle of an apologetic sentence. I got the door unlocked and dragged him inside and spread him on the long couch, threw a rug over him and let him go back to sleep. He snored like a grampus for an hour. Then he came awake all of a sudden and wanted to go to the bathroom. When he came back he looked at me peeringly, squinting his eyes, and wanted to know where the hell he was. I told him. He said his name was Terry Lennox and that he lived in an apartment in Westwood and no one was waiting up for him. His voice was clear and unslurred.

He said he could handle a cup of black coffee. When I brought it he sipped it carefully holding the saucer close under the cup.

"How come I''m here?" he asked, looking around.

"You squiffed out at The Dancers in a Rolls. Your girl friend ditched you."

"Quite," he said. "No doubt she was entirely justified."

"You English?"

"I''ve lived there. I wasn''t born there. If I might call a taxi, I''ll take myself off."

"You''ve got one waiting."

He made the steps on his own going down. He didn''t say much on the way to Westwood, except that it was very kind of me and he was sorry to be such a nuisance. He had probably said it so often and to so many people that it was automatic.

His apartment was small and stuffy and impersonal. He might have moved in that afternoon. On a coffee table in front of a hard green davenport there was a half empty Scotch bottle and melted ice in a bowl and three empty fizzwater bottles and two glasses and a glass ash tray loaded with stubs with and without lipstick. There wasn''t a photograph or a personal article of any kind in the place. It might have been a hotel room rented for a meeting or a farewell, for a few drinks and a talk, for a roll in the hay. It didn''t look like a place where anyone lived.

He offered me a drink. I said no thanks. I didn''t sit down. When I left he thanked me some more, but not as if I had climbed a mountain for him, nor as if it was nothing at all. He was a little shaky and a little shy but polite as hell. He stood in the open door until the automatic elevator came up and I got into it. Whatever he didn''t have he had manners.

He hadn''t mentioned the girl again. Also, he hadn''t mentioned that he had no job and no prospects and that almost his last dollar had gone into paying the check at The Dancers for a bit of high class fluff that couldn''t stick around long enough to make sure he didn''t get tossed in the sneezer by some prowl car boys, or rolled by a tough hackie and dumped out in a vacant lot.

On the way down in the elevator I had an impulse to go back up and take the Scotch bottle away from him. But it wasn''t any of my business and it never does any good anyway. They always find a way to get it if they have to have it.

I drove home chewing my lip. I''m supposed to be tough but there was something about the guy that got me. I didn''t know what it was unless it was the white hair and the scarred face and the clear voice and the politeness. Maybe that was enough. There was no reason why I should ever see him again. He was just a lost dog, like the girl said.

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4.4 out of 54.4 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Perry Martin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Raymond Chandler at his best
Reviewed in the United States on September 28, 2017
I first read this book - - as a paperback - - back in my teens, and it stuck with me ever since. I eventually became an author myself, and during the course of writing my third novel I referenced "The Long Goodbye" by way of the Gin and Rose''s Lime Juice cocktail... See more
I first read this book - - as a paperback - - back in my teens, and it stuck with me ever since. I eventually became an author myself, and during the course of writing my third novel I referenced "The Long Goodbye" by way of the Gin and Rose''s Lime Juice cocktail known as a Gimlet which is an integral part of Chandler''s tale. Having downloaded the first few sample chapters, just to double-check my source material, I found myself once again hooked by Raymond Chandler''s prose, at which point I decided to read the whole book again. I wasn''t disappointed. If you''ve never read a Raymond Chandler novel featuring private eye Phillip Marlowe, do yourself a favor and download this fine book. It''s complex story full of wry humor, snappy dialogue, hard-boiled tough guys and a healthy dose of twists and turns. I won''t spoil the fun by giving away any of the plot details, but I will leave you with Phillip Marlowe''s unique description of what is arguably the most popular morning beverage in the world:

"I went to the kitchen to make coffee - - yards of coffee. Rich, strong, bitter, boiling hot, ruthless, depraved. The lifeblood of tired men."
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Warren A. LewisTop Contributor: Historical Fiction Books
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Marlowe at His Best
Reviewed in the United States on December 30, 2016
Let me start by saying this particular version, I notice, is not available. That is good because this is the worst kindle conversion I have seen yet In the entire book when a word has the letters "cl" a "d" is used, therefore close becomes dose and clear... See more
Let me start by saying this particular version, I notice, is not available. That is good because this is the worst kindle conversion I have seen yet In the entire book when a word has the letters "cl" a "d" is used, therefore close becomes dose and clear becomes dear in the ENTIRE book. Periods appear in the middle of a sentence, sometimes in the middle of a word. Numbers sometimes appear in place of letters. The last ten chapters have a misspelled word on nearly every page.

Now, about the story. This is the best Phillip Marlowe I have read to date. I scored the story a 5 star, not the typing, as that is not the author''s fault. In this book Marlowe is involved in a short case that comes to a quick close and then starts another case. You just know the two have to be connected, or they wouldn''t both be in the book, but you can''t figure out how, but they do. And the end of the book has an unexpected twist. You seem to suspect this twist, but the closer you get to the end it seems unlikely, but it still ambushes you, I highly recommend.
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Curmudgeon
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I get a lot of funny looks when I begin raving about Raymond Chandler''s writing
Reviewed in the United States on October 28, 2016
I get a lot of funny looks when I begin raving about Raymond Chandler''s writing, but I honestly think he is one of the most gifted (and underrated) American novelists of the 20th Century. I have read his major novels (including this one) at least three times each, and I''m... See more
I get a lot of funny looks when I begin raving about Raymond Chandler''s writing, but I honestly think he is one of the most gifted (and underrated) American novelists of the 20th Century. I have read his major novels (including this one) at least three times each, and I''m about to embark on another trip through them. Had Chandler not drunk himself to a premature death (his skills began to diminish quickly after The Lady in the Lake), I think he''d be better recognized for the genius he was.

I won''t summarize the plot here; other reviewers have done an excellent job of that. Anyhow, Chandler''s brilliance lay not so much in his plot development (which was almost incidental, IMO), but in his ability to transport the reader back into the Noir Los Angeles of the 30s and early 40s, through the eyes of his down-at-the-heels hero, Philip (NEVER Phil!) Marlowe...and to do it without ever wasting a word. Never have I read fiction that evoked the mood of a particular time and place so well as Chandler, and with such economy of words, such minimal use of adjectives. One page of top-notch Chandler will likely hit you harder than 10 pages of other excellent mystery writers such as, say PD James or Agatha Christie. I realize that I may be going a bit off the deep end here, and that your mileage may vary. But, hey, I took 16 hours of college literature classes, and I''ve been an avid reader for 50 years. For sheer enjoyment, for the thrill of the ride, no one else even comes close. Well, maybe Tolkien, but then he was a Brit and wrote in a different genre. So he don''t count. Chandler was the writer James Ellroy wants to be when he grows up.
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w.l.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good detective story, but has not withstood the test of time
Reviewed in the United States on March 20, 2019
I have been considering reading the Edgar award winners. This book by Chandler was the 2nd recipient of the award in 1955. While it was good, it felt long and drawn out. Also some things were unpleasant or uncomfortable to read in 2019. Casual racism was a problem for me... See more
I have been considering reading the Edgar award winners. This book by Chandler was the 2nd recipient of the award in 1955. While it was good, it felt long and drawn out. Also some things were unpleasant or uncomfortable to read in 2019. Casual racism was a problem for me even though there was not a lot of it. It just kind of hung in the back of my mind. Also an issue for me was brutality and the portrayal of women. On the other hand, it has been a very long time since I read any hard-boiled detective novels from the fifties.

Marlowe helps a drunk man (Lennox) out of an imminent arrest, and finds he starts seeing the man in other places. Finally they strike up a friendship of sorts, drinking together. When the man needs a fast ride to Mexico, Marlowe obliges - as long as Lennox does not tell him anything he would be required to report to the police.

Upon his return to L.A., Marlowe finds himself to be a person of interest in the brutal murder of Lennox''s wife. The story surrounding her death, Lennox''s flight out of the country and his eventual suicide, and several other events of what appear to Marlowe to be unlikely, combine to build a Jenga tower just waiting for a misplaced block.

Of course I did begin to get confused, but Marlowe manages to put it right in his own way.

The book is good, but I am not sure it has withstood the test of time.
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JeKL
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
There''s very little good here, but there is honesty to be found--and ...
Reviewed in the United States on February 26, 2018
I picked this book up because of the series Kamen Rider W. W fans would recognize that the detective Shotaro aspires to be a "hard-boiled" detective, holding up a copy of this very book as evidence. With W having ignited my curiosity, I delved into this novel, and... See more
I picked this book up because of the series Kamen Rider W. W fans would recognize that the detective Shotaro aspires to be a "hard-boiled" detective, holding up a copy of this very book as evidence. With W having ignited my curiosity, I delved into this novel, and found myself neck-deep in intrigue.

Chandler paints a very dark, soiled image of a world where beauty is but skin-deep and where everyone''s closets are stuffed with skeletons. There''s very little good here, but there is honesty to be found--and it''s this honesty that honesty that sets this story in motion via detective Phillip Marlowe''s friendship with Terry Lennox.

Like any good mystery, a sharp-eyed reader can follow along and solve the case long before Marlowe pulls back the curtain, but even the sharpest readers might not find themselves ready for *every* twist and turn. Chandler leads readers quite deftly through the shadows and plots.

I heavily recommend this book.
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fra7299
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Less emphasis on plot, more emphasis on Marlowe in The Long Goodbye
Reviewed in the United States on December 29, 2020
It was good getting back to reading some Chandler and following Marlowe around as we wind up the final touches on this year. Reportedly, The Long Goodbye, the sixth of the seven books in the Marlowe series, was the most personal to Chandler. There are two characters... See more
It was good getting back to reading some Chandler and following Marlowe around as we wind up the final touches on this year. Reportedly, The Long Goodbye, the sixth of the seven books in the Marlowe series, was the most personal to Chandler. There are two characters (Lennox, Wade) who are central to the plot who are emblematic of some of the personal vices and pitfalls in Chandler’s own life. I have heard also that this was Chandler’s favorite of his novels.

I would say that in this novel more so than any of the other Marlowe’s I have read, there is less a focus on the actual plot (which does get quite a bit confusing in the second half), and more focus on the actual character of Marlowe. Within the scope of the plot, Marlowe’s commentary and cynicism is there, but also there is a bit of a more reflective, philosophical nature to him as he tries to care for a drunk friend (Lennox) and, then later, tries to solve a murder mystery that has unfolded.

I really thought Chandler’s prose through Marlowe’s point of view and perspective is so on point and sharp: “Guys with a hundred million dollars live a peculiar life, behind a screen of servants, bodyguards, secretaries, lawyers, and tame executives. Presumably, they eat, sleep, get their hair cut, and wear clothes. But you never know for sure. Everything you read or hear about them has been processed by a public relations gang of guys who are paid big money to maintain and create a usable personality….”

At one point, Marlowe becomes entangled and embroiled himself in the murder case and suspected, and, along the way, must deal with many seedy, unpredictable, and unsavory characters in the city as he tries to solve the case on his own. There are quite a few shenanigans pulled by these said characters, and it is always interesting how Marlowe tries to read them and size up the potential damage before he proceeds.

I would venture to say that, while The Long Goodbye is definitely a mystery (there is one key mystery at hand, but one could make the case that there are two or three other minor mysteries to be revealed), I think most of the emphasis is on the study of Marlowe.

The ending (or endings, as I felt like there were several “endings” here) does get a bit murky and muddled, and the finale might be a tad unbelievable, but I guess I could forgive it because over all I was just impressed with how Chandler put everything together.

There is also a film version, 1973’s “The Long Goodbye”, with Elliot Gould in the role of Marlowe, that I’m interested in viewing.
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grizzlybill70
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Marlowe''s conscience is clear
Reviewed in the United States on April 13, 2019
This is a classic crime novel by the ace of that type of the 40, 50, 60s. The language is a little dated but the characters and human nature remain the same century after century. Chandler keeps the plot twists coming and his conscience clean, even if he has to spend a... See more
This is a classic crime novel by the ace of that type of the 40, 50, 60s. The language is a little dated but the characters and human nature remain the same century after century. Chandler keeps the plot twists coming and his conscience clean, even if he has to spend a few nights in jail to prove his ability to keep confidences and demonstrate his separation from the cops with whom he has to deal day in and day out. You read this stuff and the color becomes black and white and there is a middle-of-the-night sax playing in the background. You don''t want it to end.
3 people found this helpful
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Mike in MS
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Old Stuff is as Good as the New
Reviewed in the United States on November 5, 2020
After reading everything written by Michael Connelly and others in his genre I decided to give the great Raymond Chandler a try. I was not disappointed. I will caution the reader, however, that Chandler must be read within the context of his time. He is not always... See more
After reading everything written by Michael Connelly and others in his genre I decided to give the great Raymond Chandler a try. I was not disappointed. I will caution the reader, however, that Chandler must be read within the context of his time. He is not always politically correct and the use of idioms and slang has long fallen to more modern language. That said, if noir is your cup of tea, Raymond Chandler is the whole teapot.
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Top reviews from other countries

John P. Sheldon
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 23, 2018
Prompt delivery. Item as described
Prompt delivery. Item as described
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Arthur Athanassiou
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Classic Detective Story from a Classic Detective writer.
Reviewed in Australia on February 14, 2021
I often hear of people talking about Chandler with great reverence ... and while I''ve only read two of his works .. his ability to deliver a story is indeed masterful. While intricately complex, Chandler lays out his tale with precision and style. I do not know how his mind...See more
I often hear of people talking about Chandler with great reverence ... and while I''ve only read two of his works .. his ability to deliver a story is indeed masterful. While intricately complex, Chandler lays out his tale with precision and style. I do not know how his mind could imagine the storylines he delivers .. but he does indeed deliver. Classic detective story, with all the grit and grime you would expect from the period.
I often hear of people talking about Chandler with great reverence ... and while I''ve only read two of his works .. his ability to deliver a story is indeed masterful. While intricately complex, Chandler lays out his tale with precision and style. I do not know how his mind could imagine the storylines he delivers .. but he does indeed deliver. Classic detective story, with all the grit and grime you would expect from the period.
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Gantry
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
La gran obra de un hombre sabio
Reviewed in Spain on January 8, 2019
Bonita edición de la extraordinaria novela de Chandler. El largo adiós trasciende el genero negro para asentarse en el círculo de grandes novelas jamás escritas. La penetración psicológica de Chandler, su increíble inventiva para la metáfora, la intencionalidad de su prosa,...See more
Bonita edición de la extraordinaria novela de Chandler. El largo adiós trasciende el genero negro para asentarse en el círculo de grandes novelas jamás escritas. La penetración psicológica de Chandler, su increíble inventiva para la metáfora, la intencionalidad de su prosa, la riqueza de las situaciones, la viveza de los personajes, los dialogos inteligentes, la ambientación histórica, hacen de esta novela una experiencia inestimable. Yo la releo todos los años. Es como encontrarse con un viejo y lúcido amigo al que escucharle es un verdadero placer.
Bonita edición de la extraordinaria novela de Chandler. El largo adiós trasciende el genero negro para asentarse en el círculo de grandes novelas jamás escritas. La penetración psicológica de Chandler, su increíble inventiva para la metáfora, la intencionalidad de su prosa, la riqueza de las situaciones, la viveza de los personajes, los dialogos inteligentes, la ambientación histórica, hacen de esta novela una experiencia inestimable. Yo la releo todos los años. Es como encontrarse con un viejo y lúcido amigo al que escucharle es un verdadero placer.
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SLK
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Entertaining read.
Reviewed in Canada on December 5, 2018
This book is an entertaining and easy read. Chandler takes us into the world of Philip Marlowe in his typical entertaining style. Fans of both Chandler and PI novels will like this one. Recommended!
This book is an entertaining and easy read. Chandler takes us into the world of Philip Marlowe in his typical entertaining style. Fans of both Chandler and PI novels will like this one. Recommended!
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Stefan Slavik
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This edition is a scam!
Reviewed in Germany on January 16, 2021
I love the original book. But this edition is only a few pages of scanned pages in Thai (?). Do not buy this!
I love the original book. But this edition is only a few pages of scanned pages in Thai (?). Do not buy this!
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