high quality Here All Along: Finding Meaning, Spirituality, and a Deeper Connection to Life--in Judaism (After Finally 2021 Choosing to Look new arrival There) outlet sale

high quality Here All Along: Finding Meaning, Spirituality, and a Deeper Connection to Life--in Judaism (After Finally 2021 Choosing to Look new arrival There) outlet sale

high quality Here All Along: Finding Meaning, Spirituality, and a Deeper Connection to Life--in Judaism (After Finally 2021 Choosing to Look new arrival There) outlet sale

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Product Description

A renowned political speechwriter rediscovers Judaism, finding timeless wisdom and spiritual connection in its age-old practices and traditions.

“Sarah Hurwitz was Michelle Obama’s head speechwriter, and with this book she becomes Judaism’s speechwriter.”—Adam Grant, New York Times bestselling author of Give and Take, Originals, and co-author of Option B


After a decade as a political speechwriter—serving as head speechwriter for First Lady Michelle Obama, a senior speechwriter for President Barack Obama, and chief speechwriter for Hillary Clinton on her 2008 presidential campaign—Sarah Hurwitz decided to apply her skills as a communicator to writing a book . . . about Judaism. And no one is more surprised than she is.

Hurwitz was the quintessential lapsed Jew—until, at age thirty-six, after a tough breakup, she happened upon an advertisement for an introductory class on Judaism. She attended on a whim, but was blown away by what she found: beautiful rituals, helpful guidance on living an ethical life, conceptions of God beyond the judgy bearded man in the sky—none of which she had learned in Hebrew school or during the two synagogue services she grudgingly attended each year. That class led to a years-long journey during which Hurwitz visited the offices of rabbis, attended Jewish meditation retreats, sat at the Shabbat tables of Orthodox families, and read hundreds of books about Judaism—all in dogged pursuit of answers to her biggest questions. What she found transformed her life, and she wondered: How could there be such a gap between the richness of what Judaism offers and the way so many Jews like her understand and experience it?

Sarah Hurwitz is on a mission to close this gap by sharing the profound insights she discovered on everything from Jewish holidays, ethics, and prayer to Jewish conceptions of God, death, and social justice. In this entertaining and accessible book, she shows us why Judaism matters and how its message is more relevant than ever, and she inspires Jews to do the learning, questioning, and debating required to make this religion their own.

“Searching for meaning in the ancient scripture and traditions of Judaism, Sarah Hurwitz takes us along on an enriching journey of discovery. In Here All Along, she explores her birthright as a Jew and finds timeless and valuable life lessons.”—David Axelrod, director of the University of Chicago Institute of Politics and former senior advisor to President Barack Obama

Review

“Sarah Hurwitz writes beautifully about her journey from Hebrew school dropout to thoughtful commentator on her heritage. She shows how this system of thought, founded in the time of shepherds, can be surprisingly relevant to modern life, with wisdom on such contemporary topics as mindfulness, gratitude, work/life balance, and politics. I recommend this book to all, no matter where you lie on the religious spectrum.” —A. J. Jacobs, New York Times bestselling co-author of The Year of Living Biblically

“Here All Along is exactly the introduction to Judaism that smart, thoughtful readers need: Not a  how-to guide to these incredibly rich and relevant traditions, but a  why-to guide that illuminates—boldly, bravely, and beautifully—why Judaism matters and how its wisdom can transform us. It''s been here all along, but now it''s here in the book in your hands, waiting for you. Open it, and discover what you''ve been missing.” —Dara Horn, author of Eternal Life

“What an achievement—to have found a way to make every aspect of Judaism utterly accessible, digestible, and emotional all at once, in one riveting volume. This is an uncanny primer for anyone wanting to understand Judaism, and also a revealing portrait of one famous speechwriter who couldn’t believe what she’d been missing all along.” —Abigail Pogrebin, author of My Jewish Year: 18 Holidays, One Wondering Jew
 
“Repeatedly drawing on her life experiences, Sarah Hurwitz paints a vision of a Judaism that is wise, intellectually rigorous, experiential, accessible—and, frankly, exciting. Even when I disagree with her, she invites me into her world. This is a book we have been waiting for, and Hurwitz is an important new voice on the Jewish scene.” —Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, author of Words That Hurt, Words That Heal and Jewish Literacy

About the Author

From 2009 to 2017, Sarah Hurwitz worked in the White House, serving as head speechwriter for First Lady Michelle Obama and as a senior speechwriter for President Barack Obama. Prior to working in government, Hurwitz was the chief speechwriter for Hillary Clinton on her 2008 campaign for president and a speechwriter for Senator John Kerry and General Wesley Clark during the 2004 presidential election. Hurwitz is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

INTRODUCTION

Why Bother with Judaism?

A decision I made in sixth grade to violate two of the Ten Commandments nearly ended my Jewish journey.

The events that led to these transgressions took place in a fluorescent-lit, industrial-carpeted Hebrew school classroom at the synagogue in the small Boston suburb where I grew up. It was a late fall afternoon, and the light was fading, as were the dozen or so elevenand twelve-year-olds unhappily marking the beginning of their seventh year of Jewish education.

We were carrying on a timeworn American Jewish tradition whereby a couple of days a week, after regular school ended, tired, restless kids were driven to their families’ synagogues, where they sat through another few hours of class during which Jewish educators attempted to teach them to read Hebrew and appreciate an incredibly complex, four-thousand-year-old religion that can be baffling for even the most intelligent adults.

Our teacher was a weary, middle-aged man whose name I’ve forgotten. But I do recall that he insisted we call him Mr. Shalom, the Hebrew word for hello, goodbye, and peace, and that he wore a brightly patterned yarmulke, which struck me as incredibly dorky. So as far as I and my classmates were concerned, he was begging us to disrespect him. And we happily complied, haphazardly filling out the Hebrew worksheets he assigned, talking over his attempts to quiet us down, and misbehaving in ways we never would have dreamed of in real school, where we were generally model students.

About halfway through class on that otherwise unremarkable day, I had a sudden moment of clarity: I was done with all of this.

Maybe it was the poor grade I had gotten on last week’s homework assignment and Mr. Shalom’s look of disappointment as he handed it back to me. Or maybe it was the moment when several of my classmates, in a rare display of cooperative behavior, decided to gang up and make fun of me. Or maybe it was just years of accumulated boredom and the sense that while I might be stuck being Jewish, I didn’t have to waste hours each week on this pointless exercise that was keeping me from worthier 1980s preteen girl pursuits, like watching mediocre TV and reading Baby-Sitters Club and Sweet Valley High books.

Whatever it was, as I walked out the classroom door that afternoon, I decided there was no way I was ever coming back.

That night, I approached my mother and launched into an impassioned speech about how Hebrew school was failing to make me into the Jew I wanted to be. The teachers didn’t challenge us! The students didn’t take class seriously! I wasn’t learning what I needed to learn to carry on our proud tradition!

My mother was, understandably, taken aback. Neither she nor my father was particularly religious, but feeling an obligation to give me and my brother some sense of Jewish identity, they had joined the synagogue in our town and enrolled us in its Hebrew school. And twice a year, on the major Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, they dragged us to services, where we squirmed through the endless droning melodies, halfheartedly recited the prayers that alternated between incomprehensible Hebrew and stilted English translations, and obeyed the seemingly random calls to stand up and sit down. The only holiday we celebrated in our home was Ḥanukkah,* but while we lit the candles and said the prayers, it was mainly about the presents.

Given our minimal Jewish practice and the fact that I had never previously displayed much interest in my Jewish education, my mother was probably suspicious of my sudden religiosity. And after some probing, she tried to stall, assuring me that she would talk to my father about it.

But I was relentless, commencing a days-long anti–Hebrew school campaign with a kind of message discipline that I find admirable today, having spent years working in political communications. At every chance I got, I let her know: This Hebrew school did not meet my needs as a Jew, and I was not going back.

Either my father bought my story or I simply wore my mother down, because within a few weeks, she found me another Hebrew school—one that mercifully met only one day a week—which agreed to take me midsemester. The following Sunday, she dropped me off for my first day of class.

Within minutes, my relief at escaping my old Hebrew school was replaced by the sinking sensation that I had done something terribly wrong, because it was clear that this new place was a bit of a loose operation. The kids were struggling to read the kind of one-syllable Hebrew words my former classmates and I had mastered years ago, and we spent much of the time singing Jewish songs with the younger children and having a meandering discussion that I think was supposed to be about Jewish ethics.

As I waited for my mother to pick me up, I thought about telling her that I’d made a mistake and the old Hebrew school was actually fine. But the memory of my former classmates’ mockery and the feeling that I’d made my bed and now had to lie in it won out. And when my mother arrived, I assured her that this new Hebrew school was both top notch and the perfect fit.

Thus began the domino effect on my Judaism. My mother soon got tired of carpooling her children to two different Hebrew schools, so she pulled my brother out of the old one and sent him to the new one with me. With that connection to our synagogue severed, it was easy enough to continue down the slippery slope of disengagement and stop attending services as well.

The following year, through my new Hebrew school, I had my bat mitzvah, which, like the curriculum, was pretty light on the Judaism. Various family members read poems and quotes. I played my flute. It was a beautiful and deeply meaningful coming-of-age ceremony, one that I will always treasure, but it bore only a passing resemblance to a Jewish life cycle ritual.

And that was about it for my Jewish observance. My ancestry stretches back through a tenement on the Lower East Side, the shtetls of Eastern Europe, and presumably all the way to the ancient Near East. But without making any kind of conscious decision beyond the one I made to dishonor my mother and father by bearing false witness to them against my Hebrew school (violating Commandments Five and Nine), I was just kind of done with Judaism.

* Note that a number of Hebrew words that appear in this book, including “Ḥanukkah,” begin with a Hebrew letter that has a guttural “H” sound and can be rendered as “H” or “Ch” in English. I’ve chosen to follow the convention of designating that guttural “H” with an “H” with a dot under it (ḥ/Ḥ) because I think “Ch” can be confusing for English speakers, who tend to mistakenly pronounce it like the “Ch” in “Chair.” I have, however, kept “Ch” when quoting from others who use it and in other select circumstances.

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5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good introduction to Judaism from a liberal Jewish perspective
Reviewed in the United States on September 11, 2019
While my approach to Judaism differs quite a bit from that of Hurwitz, I very much enjoyed this book. Readers should know that the book embraces a vision of Judaism that probably best fits into the "liberal Jewish" world-view (i.e., Reform/Reconstructionist/Conservative),... See more
While my approach to Judaism differs quite a bit from that of Hurwitz, I very much enjoyed this book. Readers should know that the book embraces a vision of Judaism that probably best fits into the "liberal Jewish" world-view (i.e., Reform/Reconstructionist/Conservative), though Hurwitz does try to present Orthodox positions in a number of places.

That being said, the book does a very nice job explaining to readers why Judaism is worthy of a modern, educated person''s attention. As Hurwitz says in the introduction, if you are looking for peace of mind or spiritual connection; looking to understand yourself more deeply; looking to become a better person; or looking to lead a more meaningful, impactful life, then Judaism might be the answer. Of course, Judaism is a 4,000 year old civilization that can be intimidating to the uninitiated. Finding the right approach is key when dealing an intellectual tradition that often assumes a certain base of background knowledge. As someone once said about the Talmud, which Jewish tradition compares to the sea in that it has no beginning or end, the trick for the newcomer is to find a place where the shore slopes gently down into the water. Hurwitz helps you do just that.

A number of people have asked me over the years for advice on where to start learning more about Judaism. This book probably comes closest to what they are looking for. While not a "how to" book, Hurwitz helps you see why Jewish practices are worth pursuing and gives you some direction for how to pursue your own Jewish journey. Whether it is the inspirational practice of prayer and meditation; the soothing calm of weekly Shabbat observance; the communal experience of the major holiday seasons; or the intellectual challenge of grappling with centuries-old texts, there is something in the Jewish tradition for everyone--but only if you know where to look. Hurwitz guides you through each of these topics, and more, giving you a taste of each. Finally, she includes a list of resources for those looking to learn more.
51 people found this helpful
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BookReview19801
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wow!
Reviewed in the United States on September 3, 2019
As someone who is not Jewish but interested (read: fascinated) by Judaism, Here All Along was an incredible journey of understanding. Sarah is vulnerable and informative, well-researched and yet, funny. I would strongly recommend the book to both believers looking to... See more
As someone who is not Jewish but interested (read: fascinated) by Judaism, Here All Along was an incredible journey of understanding. Sarah is vulnerable and informative, well-researched and yet, funny. I would strongly recommend the book to both believers looking to reflect and to non-believers looking to understand.
35 people found this helpful
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Gary Colwill
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderful View of Journey Beyond the Surface
Reviewed in the United States on September 24, 2019
Sarah Hurwitz tells the reader what has become a very common story within the American Jewish community: a coverage of Judaism in childhood that is (maybe appropriately for that age group?) shallow and perhaps uninspiring and fraught with seemingly archaic and distressing... See more
Sarah Hurwitz tells the reader what has become a very common story within the American Jewish community: a coverage of Judaism in childhood that is (maybe appropriately for that age group?) shallow and perhaps uninspiring and fraught with seemingly archaic and distressing events and ideas, which caused her disengagement from observance. Also common is that, as an adult, she began looking for something more engaging spritually (whatever that means). I think her description of her journey beyond the surface of Judaism, however, is not common. She does not shy away from aspects of the religion that her modern sensibilities clash with, but also does not simply walk away from Judaism based on these aspects. Instead, time and again, she describes her discomfort as well as her process of looking deeper at the issue and asking for help from others, which often-times led to a different and more acceptable understanding of the issue - and sometimes not. I appreciate that she does not simply brush over controversial topics, but discusses them openly, whether or not they are resolved satisfactorily. I can say that I have had similar experiences, so very much identify with much of her struggles - they are also mine.

Very valuable, in my opinion, is also the appendix, in which she points to numerous very helpful resources for learning more about Judaism - a lifelong process.

Regardless of your background or level of observance, I believe there is much here of value and recommend this book highly.
30 people found this helpful
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Harry N. Gottlieb
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Perfect Primer for the Jew Curious
Reviewed in the United States on December 10, 2019
This book is an incredible overview of the essence of what Judaism is about, as seen through the eyes of someone who finally experienced the real wonders of the religion as an adult. There are so many of us who, like Sarah Hurwitz, the author, had an impoverished Jewish... See more
This book is an incredible overview of the essence of what Judaism is about, as seen through the eyes of someone who finally experienced the real wonders of the religion as an adult. There are so many of us who, like Sarah Hurwitz, the author, had an impoverished Jewish education. I doubt there is any book available that provides such a stimulating, and eye-opening antidote to our Jewish illiteracy. Here All Along should be THE textbook for every Adult Jewish Education or Conversion Class. It''s not just that it covers the key topics (Torah, questioning and interpretation, the many Jewish conceptions of God, mitzvot, prayer, Shabbat, holidays, life cycles and more) it does it in the form of a story: how this completely non-practicing nice Jewish girl (who happened to write speeches for the President of the United States and First Lady) learned about her heritage. She writes about her skepticism, and the fraught path into Jewish life that opened her mind and her heart. I sense this book would be an inspiration for anyone who is on that path...it was for me.
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Roland E Livingston Ed.D.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Gem of a Book on Judaism
Reviewed in the United States on November 8, 2019
I have been working out my own theology for most of my adult life. Born and raised a Christian and this study revealed many things to help me continue on that effort. I recommend it highly for my Jewish and Christian friends. It is likely to deepen your faith, no matter... See more
I have been working out my own theology for most of my adult life. Born and raised a Christian and this study revealed many things to help me continue on that effort. I recommend it highly for my Jewish and Christian friends. It is likely to deepen your faith, no matter where you are on your theological journey.
13 people found this helpful
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M. Shufro
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What compelled her to write this book
Reviewed in the United States on September 17, 2021
A life-long friend recommended that I read this book. We both grew up in a Jewish environment in Merrick LI. and belonged to a Jewish synagogue. Until the age of 37when I married a Jewish woman with three sons, I was what is referred to as a "lapsed "Jew as was the author... See more
A life-long friend recommended that I read this book. We both grew up in a Jewish environment in Merrick LI. and belonged to a Jewish synagogue. Until the age of 37when I married a Jewish woman with three sons, I was what is referred to as a "lapsed "Jew as was the author at that age. She articulates the meaning of Judaism and sells it like our recent Rabbi has tried to do over 30 years. But she does not dwell why she turned to Judaism at that point in her life when she had a successful career. This is after graduating from Harvard and Harvard Law School . In the jacket, it indicated that she began exploring Judaism after a bad breakup. That''s all she wrote. I was very disappointed that she did not choose to explain. Hey, I was 36 and frustrated with my career and social life. Turn to Judaism-what for?.
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Stephanie
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Prolific and powerful
Reviewed in the United States on September 5, 2019
Sarah is prolific writer. Her journey through faith and life is relatable and joyful.
7 people found this helpful
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Bronwynn
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
ALL GOOD THINGS!!!
Reviewed in the United States on August 31, 2021
I have a million things to say about this book and ALL of them are positive! I can’t stress enough that this book is a game changer and I am unbelievably GRATEFUL to the author for writing this book. I literally feel like she took my thoughts and reservations about religion... See more
I have a million things to say about this book and ALL of them are positive! I can’t stress enough that this book is a game changer and I am unbelievably GRATEFUL to the author for writing this book. I literally feel like she took my thoughts and reservations about religion and wrote the most beautiful heartfelt book imaginable. Being raised as a Catholic / hippie I have really struggled to find my way in a sea of different religious paths. Finally I have found peace. Whether you are trying to find your path, if you’re Jewish or just want to read an awesome book read …this ones for you.
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Top reviews from other countries

William Cohen
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Speechwriter on Spirituality
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 15, 2019
Sarah Hurwitz did a top job that required her to make things meaningful, and this led her back to her own faith and heritage. This is a gentle introduction to Judaism. Sarah is curious, enthusiastic and sceptical. She yearns for deeper values in her life. I''m a Christian...See more
Sarah Hurwitz did a top job that required her to make things meaningful, and this led her back to her own faith and heritage. This is a gentle introduction to Judaism. Sarah is curious, enthusiastic and sceptical. She yearns for deeper values in her life. I''m a Christian and I found the book informative and easy to read. I''m very much into spirituality and I find my study of the 12 steps has introduced me to many similar principles to the ones found in Judaism. It strikes me that this is where Sarah''s longings are focused, she''s often reluctant to embrace traditional religion. Sarah builds a narrative around how a disappointment in her life took her on a retreat, and the retreat challenged some of her assumptions. I was particularly interested in the practice of hitbodedut - it involves going into an isolated place and talking to God for 45 minutes interrupted. That''s the sort of thing I''d like to try. Some further reading suggestions are listed in the back. I liked the laid-back way the book was written and, given that she frequently quotes people like Anne Lamott, she takes her wisdom where she finds it. We learn about Sarah''s ambivalence to Sabbath observance and how her faith informs her political instincts. We get an insight what it''s like to be a modern Jewish woman living in America.
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C G
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Awful and upsetting
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 13, 2021
The person who wrote this is vicious and hateful. She repeatedly uses spiteful language about people with mental health problems, and ascribes rules for Shabbat she dislikes to OCD. She is an ignorant person who repeatedly throws the mentally ill under the bus. If this was...See more
The person who wrote this is vicious and hateful. She repeatedly uses spiteful language about people with mental health problems, and ascribes rules for Shabbat she dislikes to OCD. She is an ignorant person who repeatedly throws the mentally ill under the bus. If this was written in the 1970s it would still be gross, but that this has been published recently is truly sickening. How such a vicious person is allowed to write books, and how her editors could have allowed this is beyond me.
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